With a heritage of growers, exporters, importers, and roasters, Orinoco Coffee & Tea has produced and sold the finest coffees and teas since 1909.

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Free shipping for any order total over $25

Coffee 101

First things first: What is a Chemex, anyway? Invented in 1941, the Chemex is an easy to use, no-frills infusion brewer, which nonetheless has been recognized by museums and coffee aficionados for its exquisite aesthetics and engineering perfection. Filters for the Chemex are significantly thicker than those for other pour over methods. Together, brewer and filter yield a rich, clean, sediment-free brew – if at a slightly slower pace. What You Will Need To brew coffee in a Chemex, you’ll need to assemble the following materials and tools. 3 cup Chemex brewer Square filter 5-7 Teaspoons of Orinoco coffee beans 600 ml

So far, we’ve learned the best practices for making coffee using the drip method, the French Press, and more. But there’s one nifty little device we haven’t yet touched upon: the AeroPress. Similar in concept to a French press, the AeroPress uses a plunger-style mechanism to swiftly press water through ground coffee to deliver a strong, concentrated cup of Joe. Engineer and physicist Alan Adler invented the AeroPress in 2005, having lost his patience with the touch-and-go nature of drip coffee makers and the pokiness of pour-over methods. What he came up with was not necessarily attractive, but it gets the job done

  Using a French press is an easy, economical, and expedient way to brew your morning java, and when done correctly yields a creamy and robust brew that’s truly hard to beat. Even better, coffee brewed using a French press can accommodate one coffee-lover, or a small group. An immersion brewer, the French Press comprises a carafe and a plunger assembly outfitted with a metal screen at the bottom. Coffee steeps for 3-4 minutes in the press’s basin or beaker, before a plunger is engaged, separating the grounds and trapping them at the bottom. Because coffee sits on the grounds for a while, bitterness can

The pour over coffee method may be as basic as it gets, yet it repeatedly delivers one of the most crisp, complex, and enjoyable coffee drinking experiences around. While a rising trend commonly associated with hipsters, the pour over is also the oldest trick in the book where coffee is concerned – giving users a great deal of control over variables, from the amount of coffee used to the precise saturation of the grounds. This degree of control mitigates error and promotes a better tasting brew. Always keep in mind: Water that is too hot will burn your grounds. Water that is

Professional opinions vary greatly regarding the best way to store your coffee. We’re not entirely sure why. Would you believe that the easiest route is also the best? Leave your coffee in the bag you bought it in, place it in your pantry or cupboard, and close the door. It’s really that simple. The finely ground print Coffee beans are highly susceptible to air, moisture, heat, and exposure to light. Therefore, coffee should be stored in a cool, dry space out of direct sunlight. Keep in mind that coffee begins to oxidize the moment it is ground. So, buy whole beans and grind only the amount you need

Along with time and temperature, grind is yet another critical variable that can cause excellent coffee to go to waste. There are so many different kinds of coffee equipment available on the market for today’s coffee connoisseurs. From French presses to pour overs to the 10-cup automatic drip machines that have become kitchen staples across the country, there are multiple ways to get our coffee fix and multiple grinds that will ensure it’s a rewarding experience. Failing to select the correct grind for your home equipment can cause over-extraction or under extraction, which alternately results in overpowering and bitter sludge or a

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